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Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2000 4:21 pm
by wwest
A film to see with crisp black white (and look at those grays) cinematography, a brilliant somewhat contrived story, but a fine story, and rare poetic images of stylized French passion.

Re: Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2000 2:01 pm
by katsuben
How did you interpret the ending? The way I see it, the entire film exists in the imagination of some guy contemplating a leap from a bridge. He has a fantastical daydream, creates in his head the consciousness of a perfect companion, and the repetition when they embrace at the finale is the moment of his leap in "reality". The final shot is therefore representative of him drowning (it's pretty obvious that the couple on the bridge are entirely different from the couple invented in this person's head. Not to mention, that several hours pass seem to pass in a split-second since it's suddenly morning). I think it's a brilliantly vague climax which allows for multiple interpretations of the film. May I ask, what was yours?

Re: Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2001 7:47 pm
by marymccluer
funkyDuck has an interesting interpretation. I didn't know quite what to think of the film. It began darkly, rain obscuring our view as a vehicle with an unknown driver drove through city streets. That blurred vision continued with the young woman's eye disease and impending blindness (blind to what?) and the graininess of the black and white photography kept things always just out of focus. But that's the way we want it, because the hardships of street life--the cold, the hunger, the filth, and the drugs to curb the gnawing pain--are more than we want to see.

Re: Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2001 12:17 am
by acquarello
marymccluer, actually, the film that you described (an artist slowly going blind who becomes involved with a homeless man) is Leos Carax's "Lovers on the Bridge". Patrice Leconte's "Girl on the Bridge" is about a professional knife-thrower who solicits potential suicide jumpers from buildings and bridges to become his assistants.

I didn't see the film as a dream or fantasy sequence of a potential suicide, but rather, as an obsessive relationship between two people who can only consummate their love through risk-taking and danger. I thought that the surreal, carnival atmosphere of the film resulted more from their abberant obsession, rather than the limitless possibilities of a dream.

acquarello
www.filmref.com

Re: Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2001 1:01 am
by katsuben
acquarello - how do you interpret the telepathy? does it exist diegetically or is it symbolic? also, what do you make of the opening scene, especially the blurred audience in the background and the off-screen interviewer. while the themes of obsessive love are crystal clear, it seems to me there are implicit unconscious elements within the narrative that might be suggesting self-reflexive or repressed qualities.

Re: Girl on the Bridge

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2001 12:32 pm
by acquarello
Okay, I see what you mean. I took the telepathy as a real event, but it could very well be diegetic. After all, it is one thing to feel a profound sense of connection (a la Kieslowski's "The Double Life of Veronique") and quite another to actually transfer one's thoughts telepathically. My reservation in attributing the plot as a manifestation of Gabor's subconscious is that the film does often change in perspective. The opening interview at the clinic is one. Then, there is Adele's affair with the groom on the cruise ship. If this was all in Gabor's mind, then why would she leave? Is it just to prove to himself that they were destined to be together? On the other hand, I can't think of a simple explanation why, one minute she is halfway around the world, then the next minute, she is on the bridge with him. Intriguing thought.

acquarello
www.filmref.com