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Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 6:49 am
by trevor826
Re: The Man with a Movie Camera, I know there are several DVD releases with different scores /soundtracks, there are two from the BFI, one with two seperate scores by the "Alloy Orchestra" and a new score by Sheffield-based duo "In The Nursery."

The other from the BFI is "Michael Nyman's Man With a Movie Camera", I will try and expanded on my comments on the film.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 10:16 pm
by trevor826
To Live, Zhang Yimou and Gong Li again, an excellent film despite the fact that at times it's pretty damn miserable. Against all the pain and despair though, there is always an air of hope and positivity for the future.

Probably my third favourite Zhang Yimou/Gong Li feature.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 10:32 pm
by Sara
Trev, I loved Man With a Movie Camera. While I can't remember much about the musical soundtrack (if there was one), I thought the editing of the film was outstanding and perhaps that is one thing it is noted for.

Sara

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2005 11:13 pm
by trevor826
Re: Man With a Movie Camera, the editing is outstanding, especially for the time it was made. It's an object lesson for film editors and without a doubt it's what mkes it stand out against other early similar films such as the Mitchell & Kenyon collection. The film uses every trick in the book and has been very cleverly filmed and unlike another recent Russian experimental film (no names mentioned) it doesn't bore you to death.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2005 6:34 am
by trevor826
Appleseed - 2004.

The computor animated update/prequel to the original anime film. Comments to follow in the anime thread.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 9:29 pm
by trevor826
I was hoping to write a review about the Russian film Nightwatch, I remember we used to have comments about it before the crash. Unfortunately it bored me so much and was less Russian (more Hollywood) than any other film I've ever seen from that part of the world. It's sad to see regions that are noted for the originality and style of their films following this route.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 9:56 pm
by arsaib4
I agree. Also, the fact that it's the most successful Russian film to date is even more disturbing.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Sep 23, 2005 5:43 pm
by wpqx
A Time to Live and a Time To Die (1985) - Hou Hsao-Hsien

Interesting early, autobiographical film from Hou, which helped break the whole Taiwan new wave (not like I remember an old wave to break away from). A story of growing up, which seems to be a hot topic for breakthrough films, but told with that simple sincerity that only a Hou film can offer (well maybe Ozu can do it too).

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2005 5:04 am
by wpqx
Autumn Almanac (1984) - Bela Tarr

Well who wants to see a bunch of miserable people try and make life more miserable for each other? If you answered yes, you have some issues you need to deal with and you should also check out this film. Perhaps because I was just thinking about the film, but this reminds me a little of the tormenting family in Zanussi's Family Life. Whereas in that film people existed for the sole purpose of making their family miserable, this group has some agenda, and of course it involves money.

The whole film is masked in darkness. Tarr tints nearly every image, and most of the picture is shrouded in blue. The takes are moderate, but certainly not the epic shots that earned Tarr his current reputation. The film is heavy on dialogue in parts, and comes off more as a chamber drama than anything else. You could see a film like this working on the stage, and therefore the actors give a theatrical performance to it. The words are spoken with some angst, and nearly everyone is prone to violence.

I was hoping my first Tarr film would be characteristic, hence the reason I avoided the three films already on DVD, but alas I'll have to wait a little longer before I can make him out as a director. I can however assess this particular work as a film in and of itself. It's not the most spectacular of films, and certainly can wear your resistance down (as many gloomy films can), but there is something intriguing in the misery.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2005 4:18 pm
by trevor826
Seijun Suzuki's Gates of Flesh, full comments to follow in Japanese Journals - General. Link - Gate of Flesh

I'm moving the whole index to page one so my comments will replace the page 2 index.

Cheers Trev.