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Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2005 8:20 pm
by trevor826
Finding Nemo again!

Italian film Private and Korean film Pisces, comments via links.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2005 3:14 am
by wpqx
Come Back Little Sheba (1952) - Delbert Mann

Wow what were they thinking? How many times have you asked yourself that watching an Oscar favorite? Well it happens a lot with me, and this was the film that brought Shirley Booth (a somewhat known stage New York stage actress) her one and only Oscar for best actress. Booth is absolutely terrible here. Her character is irritating from the first few minutes and it doesn't let up. Someting is indeed disturbing about a wife referring to her husband as "daddy" and same goes for a husband calling his wife "mommy" I mean that's enough to make you shiver.

Burt Lancaster is rarely ever bad, and I think he does just fine here, in a rather quiet performance. Booth on the other hand just gets melodramatic, so by the time she finally has a chance to do some "acting" we've pretty much lost interest in the story. The plot is slow and almost completely uneventful. I thought my girlfriend occasionally asks questions that she shouldn't but Booth's character takes that to a new extreme. Which leads me to believe that she just might be retarded, but I haven't done enough research into the source material and I'm not going to.

There are some young characters and they help to motivate the story slightly, but as supporting parts they just can't work. Booth's role was originally offered to Bette Davis, and perhaps she could have handled this better. It's a shame too, because well we all know what I think about 1952, but I really don't think the year was fantastic for actresses. If you're wondering just who I would have given the trophy to, I'd vote for Maureen O'Hara for The Quiet Man, now that was a strong female role.

Grade D +

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:40 pm
by trevor826
Started off the day with the satisfyingly beautiful "Ghost in the Shell 2 Innocence." Full comments to follow.

Early evening went downhill with the grim "Brothers Grimm", and as my mother used to say, "If you can't think of anything nice to say, don't say anything" so I'll say nothing!

Still it's still fairly early, I'm sure I can fit something else in, maybe "Harvie Krumpet."

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 12:40 am
by arsaib4
C'mon, Trev, I'm sure you found a way to disobey her on a few occasions.

Anyway, I'll let you comment on my mild recommendation of THE BROTHERS GRIMM (2005)

As one of the final releases from the Miramax which belonged to the Weinsteins, The Brothers Grimm unfortunately has to bear the scars caused by them in an outwardly fashion: The film was not only delayed on a few occasions, but along the way, it had a new cinematographer and a lead actress, both personally chosen by the moguls. Director Terry Gilliam (Brazil [1985] / Twelve Monkeys [1995]) has certainly had his battles along the way with numerous studios, so perhaps this was nothing new -- at least this time he was able to finish the film unlike a few years back when his production of "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" had to be shutdown (remember the excellent 2002 doc Lost in La Mancha?).

The Brothers Grimm is a solid, if a more commercially calculated, effort from Gilliam starring Heath Ledger and Matt Damon as the titular brothers who, in circa 1796, travel from town-to-town duping poor German peasants into believing that theyre what protects them from mystical and demonic creatures. A local general of the Napoleon army (Jonathan Pryce) becomes aware of their shenanigans, and as punishment sends them along with his maniacal Italian officer (Peter Stormare) to a village in order to solve the mystery of a few young girls whove been reported missing.

If that sounds a bit too grim, then fear not. For the most part, the film is a Monty Python-esque adventure -- meaning its inventive, extravagant, and silly, all at once. And, of course, what makes it stand out is Gilliams visual prowess, even though the look at times is less enchanting than disorienting. The screenplay by the ubiquitous Ehren Kruger features some clever folklore gags, but it spends too much time with the Grimms love interest (Lena Headey) and not enough with their ultimate enemy, an evil queen seeking eternal beauty (the ravishingly bewitching Monica Bellucci). Both Pryce and Stormare are seemingly aware of the fact that theyre in a Terry Gilliam film, and so they act accordingly; Ledger is fine with his Brando-esque mumbling (in some Australian/British accent), but he required more support from Damon, whos upstaged by his hairdo.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 4:15 am
by A
I also see no need for it, because of the index. And as I'm too lazy to even write regular reviews, I almost never mention a film under last seen. That's why I post my viewing log hehe!

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 7:28 am
by A
Would love to read your comments on Inosensu, as it was the first film by Oshi that I didn't like much. And he's one of my Top Ten directors. Didn't find the visuals beautiful, thought the plot was lame, and there was nothing complicated or very philosophical about the film. Seemed to me a minor effort. A standard film noir love story, just done in anime.
But I'll certainly give it some further tries in the future, and maybe my expectations were waaay to high. Also I was so tired during the movie, that I literally only remember 5% of the film. But when I saw it, it seemed lame and mediocre.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 7:40 am
by A
Saw Salesman by the Maysles Brothers recently, and this sure is an american classic. I can't believe the people let themselves be filmed the way they behaved, but this is a sure reminder that society was ready for soapy "talk-shows" and "reality-shows" much earlier than the 90s.
We follow four salesman on their work selling bibles door to door, while the film builds up to a human tragedy. Life wasted, hopes crushed. This is one of the most revealing films about the late 60s in america I ever saw, and an indication of almost everything that went wrong with it. Why was there a student revolt, why did the youngsters rebel? The answer can be easily found in this film. The people have no money, no hopes, live like zombies more than anything else, and aren't able to express themselves, as constant role playing is going on. Their self-esteem is so low that they consume almost anything to try to build it up. This was a really lost generation. And the salesmen are all in the same boat. No difference between them and their clients, other than that they have a different role to play in society.
If you wondered wher David Mamet got his inspiration for his Pulitzer-prize winning play "Glengarry Glen Ross" in 1984 you won't have to lokk no further. The great 1992 film version could be regarded as a kind of remake, with Jack Lemmon taking the part of "Salesman"'s protagonist. They not only look very similar, but Lemmon in what may be his best performance in his career almost mimicked Paul Brennans traits and gestures.
The film is a must see.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 1:43 pm
by trevor826
Australian claymation short "Harvie Krumpet" comments to follow.

I will comment re: Brothers Grimm and arsaib4's review.

I will also write my comments on GITS 2 but want to see the first one again so I can compare and comment on both, I plan on watching it today.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2005 8:20 pm
by trevor826
Re
my previous comment arsaib4's review

The Brothers Grimm

In my opinion, after seeing an interview with an extremely sheepish Terry Gilliam and watching the film (luckily for free) I can only come to the conclusion that this was not the film Terry intended it to be. The guy is a visionary with a distinctive sense of humour and artistic style, while we may have had a little of the humour; we lost all the style. The Weinsteins had far too much say in what could and couldnt be done seriously compromising the end result and it shows, boy does it show!

The film was spun on the weakest of premisss, The Brothers Grimm hoodwinking villagers out of their coffers by playing up to their superstitious natures using elaborate trickery was fine but as soon as the main purpose of the film, the rescue of 10 young village girls and denouement of the tricksters behind the scam, was revealed everything fell to pieces. The stars (Matt Damon especially and Heath Ledger) seemed unsure of what they were supposed to be doing and looked quite bemused and puzzled throughout most of the film. The CGI effects that replaced Gilliam's unique designs and hacked together effects were nothing short of lousy, no style, no substance and just poor to at best average CGI (yawn).

The main bad guy Cavaldi (Peter Stormare) was irritating, so irritating I just kept wishing hed drop dead (just as bad as Jim Carey in Lemony Snickett), Lena Headey, what can I say? nothing really, Id love to have seen what Samantha Morton would have done with the role (as Terry Gilliams first choice). I said it before about Brotherhood of the Wolf and I have to say it again for The Brothers Grimm, not even the gorgeous Monica Bellucci could save it, it is an unmitigated disaster with a low entertainment factor. Maybe Terry Gilliam has become too self indulgent or maybe (as seems to be the case), he sold his project and his soul to the Weinsteins and is now paying the price for dancing with the devil.


Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2005 1:28 pm
by trevor826
Sweet and fairly short, 75 mins Flemish film "Pauline and Paulette, comments to follow.

Cheers Trev.