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Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:25 am
by trevor826
A mixture of good and bad yesterday:

Pickpocket - Bresson, excellent.
Fighter in the Wind - Yun-ho Yang, overhyped, I'll write more in Korean Korner.
A Bizarre Love Triangle - Mu-yeong Lee, pretty bad, I'll write more in Korean Korner.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 11:43 am
by Sara
trevor, is Pickpocket on DVD yet? I've always wanted to see it.

Sara

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jun 03, 2005 1:36 pm
by trevor826
trevor, is Pickpocket on DVD yet? I've always wanted to see it.

It has been released in the UK by Artificial Eye as a very good 2 disc set, I don't know if it's available in the US.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2005 3:00 pm
by wpqx
not available in the US yet. New Yorker however is releasing L'Argent, or rather they were. I got an email saying that the release date has been changed, but don't know what to. Kinda pisses me off, and christ knows New Yorker's website is no help.

As for me, the last movie I saw was Crash. The Paul Haggis one, not Cronenberg's. Damn good movie, a little downbeat, but ultimately there was a redemptive quality to it that I liked. The acting was generally pretty good, although I thought the Sandra Bullock-Brendan Frasier sub plot was a little weak. And the movie even managed to get a laugh out loud from me in the theater, quite rare. Also liked the fact that the movie commented on racism without using a Southern White Redneck in a white hood. In all highly recommended.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2005 7:09 am
by trevor826
Crying Out Love in the Center of the World - Sekai no chshin de, ai wo sakebu (2004)

Wow this bothers me, it's a tragic romance that goes on for over 2 hours, it didn't bore me, it actually brought a tear to my eye, I must be getting soft in my old age or the film was effective.

Perhaps it was because the tragedy in this case was caused by leukemia or "atom bomb disease" as it's still known in Japan, either way this film has done very well in SE Asia.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:31 pm
by wpqx
The Old Dark House (1932) - James Whale

Somewhat overlooked and forgotten film from Whale during his golden age. This has a typical cast for him, with repeat performers like Karloff, Gloria Stuart, and Ernest Thiesger. The film itself is less comedic than his other films, but certainly has it's own charm. It is primarily atmospheric, and although some of it is extremely far fetched, it is overall an enjoyable early sound horror film.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:49 am
by trevor826
Springtime in a Small Town (2002)

One of those films where the more you see it the more you enjoy the subtleties of the performances. Very much a character driven movie, I wish I could see the original version though.

Cheers Trev.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2005 7:24 pm
by wpqx
Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)

A little disappointing. Perhaps it was the lack of production values, or perhaps the unfunny comedy, but I just don't see the charm in Ealing films.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 2:16 am
by wpqx
F For Fake (1972) - Orson Welles

A bit of a muddled mess, and unfortunately it suffers from a lack of unity, production values, resources, and ultimately a cohesive structure. Perhaps it can be rewarding, but on a first viewing it's too different to really appreciate fully, which may be why other people love it.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:23 pm
by mikevan9
re: F for Fake. I tried to watch it the other night and couldn't get it through it for a lot of the reasons you suggested. I'm a big Welles fan and and I wonder if people love F for Fake because we Orson nuts like to think there's some undiscovered Welles masterpiece out there.