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Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2008 12:59 am
by wpqx
I just spent the better part of four hours watching Empire of Dreams the very long and comprehensive documentary on the original Star Wars trilogy. Like I expected a great deal would deal with the first (enough for its own feature length doc) and then less and less by the time they got around to Return of the Jedi, my own personal favorite. Still a great doc that might seem at time to be a little too heavy on the ass kissing and it's always comical to think of Lucas as an independent, but certainly more informative than any other doc I've seen on the trilogy. The doc was part of the trilogy boxed set but when the original editions were released individually it was not included, luckily I found someone who had just the used bonus materials DVD to complete my own trilogy.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:27 pm
by wpqx
First Blood (1982)

Amazed to find the first Rambo movie so moving. Far from the cartoon violence that characterized the series and made it lose pretty much all credibility by part 3, this film has effectively one death and even that was because the guy fell out of a helicopter. The body count is incredibly low and there are some extremely engrossing sequences in this film. Stallone is at his best with a nearly wordless performance, and although parts of the movie might seem cliche that is because this is one of the most parodied action stories of all time and hard to remember that this was original at one point in time. In 1982 it seemed a very real problem with re-adjusting Vietnam vets coming home and this film definitely touched a nerve and can be seen as something of a flipside to Predator with the emphasis on the hunted. Outstanding picture and I can't wait to watch the next more over the top sequels.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:47 pm
by arsaib4
It's been ages since I've seen First Blood but I still vividly remember a number of scenes from the film (Stallone nursing himself back to health is one; the helicopter shot you mentioned is another; the police brutality, etc.). I guess it's high time that I revisit this one.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:04 pm
by wpqx
That Rambo collection boxed set has proven to be one my better purchases in recent years. The films are enjoyable on their own merits but if you want story, mood, and character then First Blood is probably the best in the series.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Thu Jul 03, 2008 11:48 pm
by arsaib4
Any pertinent extra features?

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:00 pm
by wpqx
Stallone does a commentary on First Blood, and there are two deleted scenes including an alternate ending which certainly would have altered the franchise. The collection has a whole extra disc of Rambo related docs and featurettes, so it's well worth the $40 price tag.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:10 pm
by wpqx
In the second official week of our Grindhouse nights we watched Blood Bath which was quite possibly the worst !#%!#*! movie I've ever seen. Incredibly slow with atrociously bad acting and several pitiful attempts at humor. Never have 83 minutes gone by so slowly, we knew the film was going to be bad however when we saw it was rated PG. Cop outs on nudity and no actual blood to speak of for pretty much the entire film. So horribly bad in every single department. Apparently PJ Soles was in it, but I missed her completely and so did the two people I watched the movie with My one comfort is that I wasn't the one who spent money on the film, so bad, so very very bad.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2008 6:35 pm
by wpqx
Rambo: First Blood 2 (1985)

First Blood was a unique and dark character study about a programmed killing machine failing to re-adjust to civilian life. For the sequel, James Cameron and Sylvester Stallone wrote a script that seemed to go against everything that made the original so special. Apparently they were the smarter ones considering the film was an unstoppable monster at the box office making a then staggering $150,000,000 which was almost $100 million more than First Blood. The typical sequel mantra of bigger, better, and more explosions was certainly in effect here. Stallone ups his dialog and the body count is ridiculous. First Blood had one casualty, here Rambo uses everything from fishing wire to rocket launchers and helicopters to kill countless commies. The film has a strange anti-American and anti-Communist tone to it, and it was rumored to be a favorite with Ronald Reagan. The idea that veterans were still out of place at home is palpable here and the underlying theme as Rambo reminiscent of John Wayne is left to wander into the sunset unsure of his future. The film is still entertaining but all too often you wind up laughing at rather than with the film in its cartoon violence and silly simple minded villains.

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 3:08 am
by arsaib4
Pialat's Police - 2-disc edition coming from Eureka/MoC on Sep 22.

• New anamorphic transfer of the film in its original aspect ratio
• New and improved English subtitle translations
• 2003 video interview with director and Police co-screenwriter Catherine Breillat, conducted by former Cahiers du cinéma editor-in-chief, and current director of the Cinémathèque Française, Serge Toubiana
• ZOOM SUR POLICE [ZOOM ONTO POLICE] (2002) - 34-minute documentary by Virginie Apiou about the production of the film
• Vintage screen-tests featuring Maurice Pialat and C. Galmiche, the inspiration for the character of Lambert
• Excerpt from a 1985 episode of Cinéma Cinémas shot during the course of the 17th day of production on Police
• 23-minute video discussion with Yann Dedet, the editor of Police
• The film's original trailer, along with trailers for other Maurice Pialat films to be released by The Masters of Cinema Series
• 40-page booklet containing a new essay by filmmaker and critic Dan Sallitt, and newly translated interviews with Maurice Pialat

Re: The Last Film Seen

PostPosted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 6:02 pm
by arsaib4
Forgetting Sarah Marshall (U.S./2008) - The latest from Judd Apatow's Fun Factory feels more instinctive and naturalistic than most of his other productions. Perhaps partly due to the fact that the film doesn't feature any major comedic stars, debutant director Nicholas Stoller is able to employ a low-key mise-en-scène which goes hand-in-hand with the improvisatory nature of the dialogue, consequently lending an aura of authenticity to the four fine lead performances (including one by longtime Apatow alum Jason Segel, who also wrote the screenplay) and making even the most awkward of moments in the film seem endearing. Those expecting another raunchy laugh riot in the vein of Superbad are likely to be a tad disappointed; but this film arguably has more heart than anything Apatow had done since the underrated television series Freaks and Geeks. Though not quite as impressive as, say, There's Something About Mary, this is a pretty good film. Apatow's upcoming Pineapple Express is directed by the talented David Gordon Green.