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Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:05 pm
by wpqx
Julia (1977) - Fred Zinnemann

Hard to imagine its been nearly a week since I've watched an Oscar nominated film. This one had a whopping 10 nominations and took home a few. The film itself is quite appalingly weak. Something about watching a period film from the 1930s that diverges into a story about nazi's and fascists that instantly makes me lose interest. I was essentially hoping for a story about writers, and instead found a story about resistance and underground zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.

Sorry but I'm really tired of films like this. The acting was largely good, and Redgrave and Robards won Oscars for their work. This is also noted as being Meryl Streeps' film debut, although her screen time is significantly limited.

*Julia was nominated by best picture, best actress (Fonda), best cinematography, best costume design, best director, best editing, best original score, and best supporting actor (Maximillian Schell). It won best adapted screenplay, best supporting actress (Redgrave), and best supporting actor (Robards)

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2007 5:20 am
by arsaib4
A couple of years ago, I held myself a "Meryl Streep Festival" (hey, one could certainly do worse), and Julia was one of the selections. I agree, it's not a great film. Streep's second effort, however, was a memorable one: The Deer Hunter. She deservedly received a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her role; her first among many, of course.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 1:08 am
by wpqx
Agreed, quite a fan of The Deer Hunter.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:27 pm
by wpqx
Heaven Can Wait (1978) - Warren Beatty and Buck Henry

The remake of Here Comes Mr. Jordan with another film's title. This one is somewhat egocentric Warren Beatty, expanding upon his self congratulatory work in Shampoo. The story is familiar, and aside from exchanging football for boxing, this one doesn't differ much from the original. Beatty and Henry's film is more comical I believe than the original, but with the same notions of tragedy. This was the last time Beatty and Christie co-starred as it was after their breakup. The film however embodies all of the old fashioned trademarks of classic escapist entertainment. Did it need to be made? Probably not, but is it still a worthwhile movie, sure.

*Heaven Can Wait was nominated for best picture, best actor (Beatty), best adapted screenplay, best cinematography, best director, best original score, best supporting actor (Jack Warden), best supporting actress (Dyan Cannon). It won best art direction.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:41 pm
by justindeimen
Goodness, wpqx. That's a magnificent effort on The Love Parade. One of the more comprehensive ones I've read.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:57 am
by wpqx
Thank you, I did it for a class I have on musicals, the paper is due tomorrow, so at least I don't think I should have to worry about my grade.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 4:23 am
by wpqx
The Prince of Tides (1991) - Barbara Streisand

Alas the 90's are done. Barbara Streisand's film hasn't fared as well through time. Streisand the director has a few operatic moments here, particularly the dancing at the Rainbow. However there are things to admire here. Nick Nolte's performance is possibly the best of his career, and he was heavily favored to win the best actor Oscar that year. Perhaps not as impressive but surprising was George Carlin's brief appearance here as a gay man. Much of the supporting cast is good, but Nolte and Streisand don't exactly connect. The chemistry is forced and somewhat lacking. Respectively they're both good, but they don't work together. The film seems to peak about 100 minutes into it, yet continues with a somewhat sloppy romance that is resolved rather unclimatically. There were numerous better films that could have benefited from the Oscar nomination, but I won't go around saying the film was a complete waste.

*The Prince of Tides was nominated for best actor (Notle), best picture, best adapted screenplay, best art direction, best cinematography, best original score, and best supporting actress (Kate Nelligan)

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:09 am
by wpqx
The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) - George Stevens

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
Ok now seriously, only Hollywood could make such a disgrace of this story. Turning it into a cliche ridden love story for Christ's sake. Trying to pay attention to the film, and watch what's happening you'll find yourself quickly falling asleep. It is incredibly slow, with several scenes (particularly the forced romance) almost unbearable to watch. I may also object to Anne Frank being played by a 21 year old model. Stevens seemed overly full of himself following the success of A Place in the Sun, Shane, and Giant. This is possibly the most self righteous and indulgant film of the bunch. Some first rate cinematography permeates the picture, and much of the film is in sharp contrast. The story is familiar, but it is played to ultimate Hollywood effect here.

*The Diary of Anne Frank was nominated for best picture, best supporting actor (Ed Wynn), best drama or comedy score, best director, best black and white costume design. It won for best supporting actress (Shelly Winters), best black and white cinematography, and best black and white art direction.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 8:42 pm
by wpqx
The Towering Inferno (1974) - Irwin Allen & John Guillermin

It may seem odd to think of a big budget disaster film garnering 8 Oscar nominations, but how much different is this than Titanic? Allen's over ambitious granddaddy of disaster films contains a well stocked cast, and with only a very minimal of backstory pulnges right into the catastrophe. At least 120 of the 165 minutes of this story are devoted to the fire and burning, and people squabling about how to stop it, and how to evacuate everyone from the 135th floor. Fred Astaire got a surprise Oscar nomination for best supporting actor without doing much of anything, certainly not any acting. Sociologically this doesn't have the same undercurrent that Earthquake had, that film relishing in the joy of self destruction. Here, Paul Newman and Steve McQueen are superheroes out to save the world, although they don't wear capes. Some of the plot lines are forced and you wind up spending far too much time showing explosions to make us actually give a crap about who lives or dies. Calling it the high water mark of the disaster craze still doesn't make it a resounding success. As a curiosity though, I'd say the best part about this film is watching OJ Simpson.

*The Towering Inferno was nominated for best picture, best art direction, best editing, best original dramatic score, best sound, and best supporting actor (Astaire). It won for best original song and best cinematography.

Re: Oscar Nominated Films

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 8:22 pm
by wpqx
Cat Ballou (1965) - Elliot Sliverstein

A comedy/musical/western hybrid that won Lee Marvin as somewhat surprising Oscar. Jane Fonda in one of her first major American roles, plays the title character who goes from schoolmarm to outlaw relatively quick. Lee Marvin plays two roles here, and well that sort of thing impresses Academy voters, especially playing against type. The film is witty at times, and the Greek chorus supplied by Nat King Cole is a punctuating highlight. However Marvin's performance is rather secondary even if he's playing two roles. As a western this has fun playing against certain stereotypes, but ultimately complying with them. At least now I have every best actor winner covered from 27-67.

*Cat Ballou was nominated for best adapted score, best adapted screenplay, best editing, and best song. It won for best actor (Marvin).