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Good Morning, Night - Buongiorno, notte (2003)

PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:02 pm
by trevor826
Good Morning, Night - Buongiorno, notte (2003)

Released on region 2 DVD - Artificial Eye.

Just a little info about the film, this is a kidnapping drama based on a real incident, a point that was driven home to me as I was watching the film, "Aldo Moro" and "The Red Brigade" took me back to my youth, they meant little to me then partly because of my age and because it happened in Italy.

You don't need to know or be interested in the historical context of the film as it works well as it stands, you follow the story sharing the feelings and thoughts of the only female of the group of kidnappers, Chiara as her mind twists and turns as the all too palpable levels of tension and futility rise. We are given insight to her true feelings through a number of dreams she has during the film, although you are unaware these are dream sequences until reality slaps you in the face. An extremely good drama, well devised, constructed and edited.

An excellent transfer of the best modern Italian film I've seen for quite a while. Sound options allow for stereo and 5.1 surround although you don't get much use from the rear speakers, mainly quiet ambient noise and the odd burst of Pink Floyd.

Subtitles are removable and are clear and sharp.

As far as extras go, there's a trailer for the film, a filmography for the director Marco Bellocchio and a very enlightening 40+ minute documentary covering the making of and giving some historical background to the film.

A warning though, during the documentary you do see vintage film of executions, they may be old but they are still shocking.

Cheers Trev.

Re: Good Morning, Night - Buongiorno, notte (2003)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 13, 2005 8:49 pm
by arsaib4
"You don't need to know or be interested in the historical context of the film as it works well as it stands, you follow the story sharing the feelings and thoughts of the only female of the group of kidnappers, Chiara as her mind twists and turns as the all too palpable levels of tension and futility rise. We are given insight to her true feelings through a number of dreams she has during the film, although you are unaware these are dream sequences until reality slaps you in the face. An extremely good drama, well devised, constructed and edited. "

Well said! But I'm sure there are a few who prefer to be spoon-fed, instead of using the web or the library on their own for something useful. It's a wonderful film and I'm looking forward to its release in the U.S.

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[12/20/07 - Last Film Seen thread]

A: "I liked Buongiorno, notte, but if it hadn't been for Bellocchio's "magic realism" at the end, my appreciation of the film would be much lower. If you don't watch it as a character study, there is little else to recommend it. I don't think you absolutely need to know about the political background to appreciate the film. On the other hand, the first time one hears Pink Floyd on the screen, it isn't bad if you have a broader knowledge of politics (and films) in the 20th century. I was so emotionally moved during this scene, that I started to cry, which was a big surprise, as the moment in the movie almost seemed to come out of nowhere. One of the best and most powerful scenes I have seen in any film this year. "

arsaib4: "Floyd's "The Great Gig" and "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond" crystallized the pain, the fear, the anxiety of the era and, as I'm sure I've said before, Bellocchio adroitly managed them along with the other pieces. That was an emotional moment, A, and it also made me feel part of a larger scheme of things -- very unique. The fact that Bellocchio doesn't take away our power to dream, no matter how harsh the reality, was a hopeful sign, a sign of growth. As for the rest, his preoccupations were there -- the group's familial dynamics were especially quite fascinating to me. And his formalism, which doesn't get enough attention, was simply exquisite: Bellocchio's trademark play with light symbolized the contradictory ideologies and goals, all the more appropriate considering Good Morning, Night could qualify as a chamber drama."
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[Edit]Added 12/20

Re: Good Morning, Night - Buongiorno, notte (2003)

PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2007 4:34 pm
by R6dw6C
I watched "Buongiorno, Notte" in the theater one day ago (and as Italian Cinema is one of my special interests of high importance, I couldn't miss it) and it took my breath away. If a film handles with political history in a political way, it very often ends up as precocious and dry intellectual mathematics but Bellocchio's film is a whole different thing to recept. A wonderful quote by German filmmaker Roland Klick came to my mind about humanistic reduction in cinema - I shall post it within the next days (as well as the first DVD-Index which I intended to give to you as some sort of Christmas gift ) and that cinema should move away social critism and politics to look at the process in the people themselves - because it's the motor of it all. Though the film gave it all an additional spiritual dimension, this was certainly the thing that impressed me most because Belloccio substituted all the usual impressions of similar films through the individual state and its strength. If I will ever be a filmmaker as I intend to, the consequence of that point of view would definitely be one of my prior "rules". Not to mention the amazing formalism which was, in way, really vivid and relaxed. And the use of the soundtrack, not only of the Pink Floyd piece but also that choir... It gave me the chills...Overall, possibly the last addition of my 2007's favourites (still awaiting "Eastern Promises"). The only thing that flawed the film really was the fact that of those five (or six?) protagonists, the only one who feels with Moro and regret the deed, is the only woman. Certainly. Women are more emotional than men. That was a bit patriarchal and annoying, imo. Even though the script moves around Chiara's (Maya Sansa) Character very deferently. And maybe, some cliches weren't bypassed cleverly enough but in the small, artificial universe in Bellocchio created in this flat, such faults aren't too obvious between characters moving like their own ghosts around each other - without being alienated in a common way. (22 out of 25 - 9/10)

It isn't necessary to know much about the historical / political background but I would've been grateful if so.

EDIT: Thanks for moving the thread, arsaib. Now, all posts are together and I realize that my post (and reception fo the film) has much in common with yours.