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DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 7:50 pm
by wpqx
I have downloaded a few films and found that the subtitles are only text files and not encrypted on the AVI file itself. Well there's a program called BS.Player that supports .sub files. As such I'll now be able to watch my three Mikio Naruse films I downloaded. There's a free version of the player available so keep it in mind if you run into the same problem.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Fri Feb 15, 2008 11:13 pm
by arsaib4
Is downloading films, especially classics, more prevalent than I realize? Your tone sort of indicates that to me. But can the beauty of Naruse be truly appreciated from an online media player?

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:35 am
by wpqx
There are some good external monitors and downloading films seems to get bigger more and more. I even found a torrent for Face to Face, which is in progress.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 1:27 am
by arsaib4
One thing I do know about torrents is that your IP address becomes visible to others, which to me sounds like a very unsafe process. Aren't you taking a big risk by downloading, as you've stated elsewhere, Hollywood films?

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 6:45 pm
by wpqx
For the people who would be concerned I think the primary target are the people uploading, but I'll let you know when the Feds show up.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2008 10:02 pm
by arsaib4
You're probably right. Contrary to popular belief, that embodies the future of "home entertainment," not any of the DVD formats. I fully expect most of us paying a small fee to download a given film and then either watching it on our computers or the television sets via some sort of a converter box.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 11:00 am
by justindeimen
wpqx wrote: For the people who would be concerned I think the primary target are the people uploading, but I'll let you know when the Feds show up.

That's actually a fallacy, depending on the method of distribution. If you use a method such as P2P (and since you mentioned torrents, this is especially so), the downloader is invariably an uploader as well, for other downloaders.


Personally, and hopefully without stepping on anybody's toes, the idea of illegally (I'd welcome a legal alternative if it meant I'd never have to sit next to a person with a sneezing fit again) downloading films, especially new ones readily available (or soon to be) on DVDs or cinemas makes me queasy. Though, on the flipside, I can understand cineastes attempting to watch older and rare films in any form they can get their hands on.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:58 pm
by wpqx
Well whenever the US plans on releasing those Naruse films by all means I'm waiting.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2008 12:16 am
by arsaib4
justindeimen wrote: Personally, and hopefully without stepping on anybody's toes, the idea of illegally (I'd welcome a legal alternative if it meant I'd never have to sit next to a person with a sneezing fit again) downloading films, especially new ones readily available (or soon to be) on DVDs or cinemas makes me queasy. Though, on the flipside, I can understand cineastes attempting to watch older and rare films in any form they can get their hands on.

It's coming, a legal alternative, that is (at least for independent and foreign films). The likes of IFC and Magnolia have done well with "day-and-date" releases via VOD, and the next step ideologically is to make the product available online, which I where the consumers are headed.

It would be pretty embarrassing if someone were to get caught downloading a Rob Schneider movie.

Re: DVD Subtitles

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2008 4:37 am
by wpqx
I think it'd be more embarrassing if someone were paying for a Rob Schneider movie.

In all honesty though this is the same thing that happened with music, it took a few years for record companies to figure out how to make money off of downloading and now they're raking in the dough like never before, so shall it be with cinema as hard drives get larger and larger, HD formats become more widespread.

I don't see any real damage to film as a whole and this is far from a crisis. Just as a point of reference an estimated 60 "adult" features are released on DVD every week and no matter how popular Cloverfield might be it'll probably never be downloaded as much as the films from the other side.

The history of the internet will be marked by tremendous freedom being stomped out and ruined by greedy corporations and lawyers.