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The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:23 am
by wpqx
I'm no expert, in fact this (along with 1902) are probably my two weakest years in the silent era. However I read an article by David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson when they professed a deep admiration for the year and describe it as extremely vital in the development of classic continuity style. At the end of the article, Bordwell submitted a list of the best films still in existence from the year. Sort of a deliberate attempt to contradict all the top tens for 2007. However the list I found very helpful and a select few of the films are actually available on video. All do survive in archives somewhere around the world so there's hope for the future. I find it interesting that although two films directed by Sjostrom (and a third that he appeared in) are included, yet his best known film from the year The Outlaw and His Wife wasn't thrown in.

The Clown (Denmark, A. W. Sandberg)

Easy Street (U.S., Charles Chaplin)

The Girl from Stormycroft (Sweden, Victor Sjstrm)

The Immigrant (U.S., Charles Chaplin)

Judex (France, Louis Feuillade)

The Mysterious Night of the 25th (Sweden, Georg af Klercker)

The Narrow Trail (U.S., Lambert Hillyer)

The Revolutionary (Russia, Yevgenii Bauer)

Romance of the Redwoods (U.S., Cecil B. De Mille)

Terje Vigen (Sweden, Victor Sjstrm)

Straight Shooting (US, John Ford)

Thomas Graals Best Film (Sweden, Mauritz Stiller)

Wild and Woolly (US, John Emerson)

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:09 am
by arsaib4
It's possible that The Outlaw and His Wife is credited as a 1918 film by the duo.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 5:11 am
by wpqx
Perhaps, but at least this gives me a few options as far as what to keep an eye out for, I think I've seen a whopping one film from their list.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:55 am
by arsaib4
I've only seen three, so I'm not about to congratulate myself either.

Judex is the one, right?

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:29 pm
by wpqx
Yep, I'm a little behind on my Chaplin shorts.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:00 pm
by A
I think this is a great idea to counter the onslaught of Year Best lists. Although I'm guilty myself, it seems to me like we are literally drowning in them, forgetting the great achievements of the past. If I recall correctly, 1917 was a crucial year, as film production was at its lowest due to World War I. I don't think I've seen a single film from that year, but I'd have to check.

Well, I definitely haven't seen any of the films on the list. Fortunately some are available on DVD, so it shouldn't be too difficult getting hold of a few in the future.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 2:42 am
by wpqx
I've made a few strides, but I was upset to find that despite what was reported on their website Facets didn't have Wild and Wooly and I'm very curious to see some of Fairbanks' comedies.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 8:42 am
by A
I believe Kino could have some of those. I know that I have one early Fairbanks comedy on DVD from Kino.

Re: The Best of 1917

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:46 pm
by wpqx
Most of his available work are his 20's adventure films, which although good only hint at roughly half his output. The only thing close would be Mr. Robinson Crusoe which although enjoyable at spots was certainly Fairbanks past his prime.