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Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:40 pm
by madhuban
trev,

I regret not being a sixties child! But I did grow up listening to Pink Floyd, Deep Purple and Jethro Tull. I was fortunate enough to hear Deep Purple live in Bangalore, in 2001, and am about to fulfill the other great dream of watching Ian Anderson live on Feb 3rd. Deep Purple In Rock is brilliant, and "child in time" is a great favourite. "Machine Head" and "Purpendicular" came from the top of my head because i'd been playing "Highway star" and "Ted, the mechanic" yesterday Frankly, I don't think any band in rock history had such an smashing line-up. It is usually one or two outstanding musicians that make or break bands!. And in Deep Purple you had a surfeit of them! Who would have thought that they would find a replacement for Blackmore! I heard Steve Morse jamming live with John Lord. Oh, it was astounding!

And, I forgot The Doors!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "Spanish caravan" will make my top 20 songlist on any given day!

wpqx,

I'm surprised too that you have so much Tull! I too meet with a lot of raised eyebrows when I say i'm fond of Tull, and I smirk and say "get older pal"! But, now that argument won't work!

I like your rule about ruling out compilations. I do not consider them myself, and almost never buy "best of" CDs. Sorry about the Marley faux pas. With song musicians, I'm forever in a quandary about putting down favourite albums

I've begun listening to jazz seriously for the last couple of years. Agreed, "A Love Supreme" should have been there.

M

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2006 8:53 pm
by A
Don't worry John, my booklist is pretty "eclectic". In most cases I only read one book per author, and what I read is really "odd choice" sometimes. And haven't been doing much reading for the last two years. From your list I've only read 5, and some I haven't heard of yet.
Your music lists reveal you all to be quite similar when it comes to Rock. I must say that I'm ignorant about most stuff by U2, Bob Marley, Sting, Deep Purple, Jethro Tull, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, etc., etc.
My own list would be more "singer-songwriter-pop". I'll try something later.

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 5:48 am
by wpqx
Regarding Richie Blackmore's replacement

Steve Morse is/was the man behind the Dixie Dregs, and I must say it is nearly impossible to find ANY guitarist in the world better. I mean the man has chops like you wouldn't believe. I'd recommend downloading a live version of "The Bash" off of the Dixie Dregs California Screamin album, or Steve Morse's solo track "Tumeni Notes" arguably the best playing you may here from a guitarist. Never saw Deep Purple, but did see the Dregs twice, so the boy can play. My jazz collection is only at about 150 albums or so, so I'm not an expert, just know more than most people I meet. As far as John's booklist, I think I've read two, but at least he has 1984, which would be my #1 if I ever sat down to do it. I'm in the process of reading Jack Keruac's On the Road, and man is it good. Unfortunately it's also giving me the burning desire to hitchhike out west, a temptation I really don't need.

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Sun Jan 22, 2006 5:31 pm
by madhuban
@ A

I was also intrigued by your list of books! Of course, it woke me up to one serious omission in my list: no plays! And I have at least ten that should go into a list like this

Please enlighten us about "Entsichert: Krieg als Massenkultur im 21. Jahrhundert" - Tom Holert, Mark Terkessidis. Sounds like non-fiction and I seem to recall reading an interview of Nan Goldin done by a Tom Holert. Is it the same person?

@wpqx

Thanks a ton for the recommendations. Will download the tracks now! And your mention of the word "guitarist" alerted me to an awful faux pas in my music list! Why aren't there such names as Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Joe Satriani and Eddie Van Halen on my list!!!

M

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 1:05 am
by A
Don't know about the interview, but it may be the same person - if you can give me some more sources?
The book is non-fiction (as are some others on my list), and as far as I know only availabla in german language. The two guys are freelancing journalists, and initiated the "institute for studies in visual culture" in Cologne.
The book is about our western society's opposed to third world countries, and the way we have integrated war and violence into our everyday lives. It argues that in our "peaceful" society war is taking place in our heads and in our everyday lives as a way of competition in every field and our "body-culture". How the western society sees life as a battle where only "success" counts, opposed to the third world countries where war and violence are omnipresent, but not wished for. Basically we (with the help of indoctrination through the media) construct our own wars, while the third world wants to get rid of theirs, but of course can't because of "us". The book reflects most of this through several Hollywood films that exemplify this message.
I know my explanation sounds a bit messy.

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:58 pm
by madhuban
Thanks A for the description of the book. Seems to be the same Tom Holert because the one i'm talking about is also interested in visual culture. Can't remember where I read the Nan Goldin (he is a photographer) interview though. Maybe the book will get translated into English soon. Will want to read it.

M

Re: Cultural 100.

PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2006 6:01 pm
by wpqx
Nowhere near close to making a book list, but I did just finish Jack Kerouac's On the Road, which is contestable for my favorite book ever.