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The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Thu Apr 17, 2008 5:43 pm
by wpqx
Stumbled upon this list today, not so much the best films just the top ten that seem the most important or relevant in the long haul. The list is chronological btw.

1. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)
2. City of God (2002)
3. Lost in Translation (2003)
4. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
5. Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)
7. Brokeback Mountain (2005)
8. Caché (2005)
9. Borat (2006)
10. There Will Be Blood (2008)

Re: The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 4:37 pm
by jcdavies
Well, Fahrenheit 9/11 didn't seem to have much impact on the US election. And of course Crouching Tiger was very indebted to Touch of Zen, so perhaps that should be included in the list?

Re: The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 10:36 pm
by justindeimen
What a strange timing for this list. It's not even the end of the decade yet. And including "There Will Be Blood" doesn't make much sense to me as it's impact can only be apparent with the benefit of time, a couple of years at the least.

And personally, would have swapped "Fahrenheit 9/11" with "Bowling for Columbine".

Re: The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 2:11 am
by wpqx
Fahrenheit made a much bigger impact though and made about 5 times as much at the box office, which would make it worthy in terms of making documentaries commercial films rather than impacting a presidential race, if that was the criteria used. I've noticed that there seems to be a No Country or TWBB split. Most people seem to passionately love one and are either indifferent or outright dislike the other.

Re: The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2008 8:20 am
by justindeimen
Yes, "Fahrenheit 9/11" was successful. But that's why I think "Bowling for Columbine" should be included in its place because there's a case to be made that Fahrenheit's success can be attributed to Moore's previous documentary, by laying the groundwork, if you will.

Re: The Guardian 10 Defining Films of the Decade

PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2008 6:31 pm
by jcdavies
It was a pity in Fahrenheit 9/11 Moore went off on a tangent in the last 1/3, about working classes in the US armed forces, and he would have done better to keep a lower profile as his smart alec manner is counter-productive; the issues of what happened or more pertinently didn't happen on 9/11 deserved to remain the focus of attention