Volver (2006) (Spain)

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Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby hengcs » Tue May 23, 2006 1:20 am




Director: Pedro Almodvar
Cast: Penlope Cruz, Carmen Maura

The official site
see
http://www.clubcultura.com/clubcine/clubcineastas/almodovar/volverlapelicula/index.html
hengcs
 


Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby Anasazie » Tue May 23, 2006 1:59 am

Yawn!!!! tired of the attention this guy gets. Undeserved.
Anasazie
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby hengcs » Tue May 23, 2006 2:19 am

Hi
Maybe we should be more objective.
Wait for the film, watch it and decide ...

PS:
There are well known directors who produce great films
There are also unknown directors who produce great films
There are well known directors who produce lousy films
There are unknown directors who produce lousy films

My point is:
Give every film a chance ... regardless of who directs it or how well/poor the director's previous films are ...
hengcs
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby Anasazie » Tue May 23, 2006 2:59 am

If i did that, i'd be forever watching films that are shite. You have to have some kind of filter system. I don't like Pedro's style and i think his work is wildly over-rated. Their are much better film-makers who don't get attention so i'd rather give it to them.

Hell, i'd be watching Ron Howard films if i had that reaction. It's like saying to someone they can't refuse to watch anymore Spielberg films even though they've seen 10 and absolutely despised them all.
Anasazie
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby madhuban » Tue May 23, 2006 6:15 am

For once I agree with Anasazie that this guy gets too much attention and is hugely over-rated. Nevertheless, I will watch the film when I get the chance.

I was trying to think how miserable I'd be if he walks away with the Palme D'Or, but if Michael Moore could, having made a pamphlet, why grudge Pedro his over-the-top sentimentalism

M
madhuban
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby A » Tue May 23, 2006 7:55 am

Don't know if he's overrated..., and didn't he get more attention in the 80s?
So far I've only seen three of his films. Hable con ella which I loved, La mala educatin which was acceptable, and Carne trmula which was,... hm, slightly above average? But at least it had Javier Bardem in a wheelchair. Maybe Almodvar was trying to overcome some teenage traumata with a fairytale ending, but corny as it is I like it.
I must say that from the three films I have seen, subtle Almodvar is great, while kitchy and kinky Al isn't kitchy or kinky enough. But maybe with Volver he will return to his supposedly shriller 80s work.
Which films of his have you seen M?

Anyway, the poster is really gorgeous - and it also makes Penelope Cruz look good (was never a fan of either her looks or her acting )
But, I'll probably watch it.
Now if I could only get past my doubts that i won't be able to completely understand serbian subtitles, and watch two other Almodvars I have on DVD

And I completely agree with hengcs. I try to give every film a chance - at least if I start watching it
Of course you have to select what you are watching, but without watching a film you canimo give NO judgment to it, whatsoever. Who knows, maybe Ron Howard will make THE masterpiece of the new millenium with his next film? As the saying goes, art is in the end always "self-sufficient" in a way. The artist who initially produced it becomes marginal compared to the work itself. And thus the future holds innumerable possibilities... Ah what a wonderful (film)world lies ahead of us, nothing pre-determined and everything possible.
A
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby madhuban » Tue May 23, 2006 9:32 am

A, I agree with hengcs and you that every film ought to be seen before one makes up one's mind. That is the reason why I will definitely watch "Volver" inspite of my general indifference to Almodover's work. He might just surprise me!

I've seen "Bad Education", "Talk to Her", "All About My Mother", "Live Flesh", "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!", "Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown" and "Dark Habits". So, I can't be blamed for being prejudiced to the point of refusing to see his films And, I've wanted to see "The Flower of My Secret" for sometime.

It isn't true that I disliked the films altogether. I have probably enjoyed "Dark Habits" and 'Women on the Edge of a Nervous Breakdown" the most. But, I do think that Pedro being described as one of the great living filmmakers is an exaggeration. Yes, he often makes aesthetically-pleasing entertaining films. But, I've always wondered if there's more, and I've missed it. Perhaps, I'm disappointed because he promises to explore ambiguity, then gets muddled and gives it a comfortable resolution. For instance, I found the moral ambiguity of "Talk To Her" very badly handled in the last half hour just as "Dark Habits" tries to cover similar ground, but cannot hold a candle to "Viridiana". His dark humour isn't gritty enough, his kitsch is underdone, and his sensuality and wickedness simply flirt with the hemline of middle class sensibility. It was as if he'd lost the plot and settled for the easiest escape route.

I've asked myself why I cannot swallow them as over-the-top melodramatic films. The answer I've come up with is that they pose as "arthouse" films (I don't like to demarcate arthouse and mainstream, but in Pedro's case, he seems to me to consciously using elements of the non-mainstream with a purpose), have all the recognisable trappings, but are hollow at the core. All his films promise to take risks (and I can't help feeling that he thinks its fashionable to do so) and then fall short. It is this conscious aestheticisation (the rape scene in B&W for example) sticking out like a sore thumb, that looks fake and annoys me. Just my weird take maybe!

p.s. On a less serious note, do watch the clip from Kaurismaki's press conference and his straighfaced gag at the expense of Pedro www.festival-cannes.fr/fi...a=18368667
M
madhuban
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby arsaib4 » Wed May 24, 2006 2:11 am

"Perhaps, I'm disappointed because he promises to explore ambiguity, then gets muddled and gives it a comfortable resolution. For instance, I found the moral ambiguity of "Talk To Her" very badly handled in the last half..."

I, on the other hand, believe that the last half of Talk to Her is quite possibly the finest passage of his career. "Nothing is simple." Almodvar answered the quandary himself. So I'm not sure what made you think that it was a comfortable resolution.

Is he one of the greatest living filmmakers? I'm not sure, but that's quite relative. While I'm glad that you normally don't distinguish between arthouse and mainstream, you are chiding his work because it crosses over. How many filmmakers today could say that about their films? Not many.
arsaib4
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby A » Wed May 24, 2006 10:15 am

@ madhuban

I must say that i agree with you on a lot of points.
I don't think he's one of the great living filmmakers, and I also think that his "daring" exploration is usually not daring enough (for my tastes). But I wouldn't say he necessarily resolves to comfortable solutions. I totally agree with arsaib on what he wrote above regarding "Talk to her". I don't see anything simple about it, and it's deeply ambiguous.
Let's see,... When Benigno nurses Alice, he has fallen in love with someone he doesn't know, and with whom he can deal in the only way known to him (as he has nursed his mother his whole life). But on the other hand you could say he obviously loves her for what she really is for her soul, not for her character, or the way she thinks or what she does. That's maybe what he has fallen in love with in the first place (he knew her before the accident). Of course one could also say that he can project everything he wants onto her, but from the way he treats her in the film I wouldn't assume this. He is the only one who seriously regards her as still living, and tries to talk with her in her own way. When he sleeps with her (I wouldn't call it rape) it's again very ambiguous. Besides the obvious intrusion et al, one could say that through his love for her he saves her, as she wakes up when she becomes pregnant. He is also the one who unites marko and her in the end, through his friendship and his death. Without it, the beautiful ending wouldn't have been possible. Though you might see the death of Benigno as an escape, the end nevertheless doesn't resolve anything. It just offers new hope. And Benigno is also a metaphor throughout the film for that. I wouldn't necessarily see he as a "real" character, but more of a guiding angel for all of the other people around him. He is like in a fairy-tale the catalyst for most of what happens, and his death might be not only the death of a character that is not needed anymore (plot-wise), but also the aknowledgment of Almodvar, that he is in fact too good for the "real" life that sets in again after the "comatose interplay".
Anyway i adore the whole film. I've seen it numerous times and could go marvelling over it on and on.

Quote:His dark humour isn't gritty enough, his kitsch is underdone, and his sensuality and wickedness simply flirt with the hemline of middle class sensibility.
I would mostly agree with this, but I don't think he is necessarily pondering to the "arthouse" circuit with it. It's maybe just the way he is.
Again I would repeat arsaib: "While I'm glad that you normally don't distinguish between arthouse and mainstream, you are chiding his work because it crosses over. How many filmmakers today could say that about their films? Not many."
A
 

Re: Volver (2006) (Spain)

Postby A » Wed May 24, 2006 10:25 am

Thanks for the link to the conference with Aki. Man, I could listen to that guy talking for hours, he's really great.
That reminds me of the fact that I haven't seen more films by him than by Almodvar, though i prefer his style. I'm really lazy when it comes to watching more than two or three films by a single director
A
 

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