Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

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Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby shockmaster93 » Sun Sep 11, 2005 5:30 am

In "Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring", what does everyone think the meaning of the door in the temple is? I have my own idea after taking some Asian studies classes, but I'd like to hear what you guys think. Everyone who has seen the movie seems to wonder about this particular facet of it.
shockmaster93
 


Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby trevor826 » Sun Sep 11, 2005 8:13 am

Which door do you mean?

The one inside the temple itself where the pupil sleeps?

In my opinion all the doors have the same purpose, despite the lack of walls each is a cut off point. The one outside the temple seperates it from the outside world whereas the ones inside the temple are to seperate the living/sleeping areas from the actual prayer area.

You have to remember that Kim Ki-duk is not a buddhist and is only trying to interpret and understand.

So what is your interpretation?

Cheers Trev.
trevor826
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby shockmaster93 » Wed Sep 14, 2005 1:03 am

My explanation might seem a bit difficult to grasp if you're not familiar with Buddhism, not that I'm an expert or anything. At first I wasn't sure why there was a door inside the temple dividing the sleeping quarters from the rest of the place. I watched the film in my Korean & Japanese Religions class. The class was great, and one day while on the internet, I read about a collection of koans (paradoxical riddles, questions, dialogues meant to stop logical, one-way thinking and spark enlightenment) called "The Gateless Gate." The gate is gateless because we've already passed through it; we are already all Buddhas in Mahayana Buddhism but we just don't know it. Then I realized that there was no real purpose for having a door with no wall present; one could easily circumvent (correct word?) the door or gates, just like one can easily walk through a gate that is gateless. So, I think that the door in the temple and even the gates that divide the water from the land are there to urge us to tap into our "Buddha nature" and realize that nothing separates us from it. In general, no two things are separate from each other in the Law of Dependent Origination. So, in a sense, the presence of gates and doors in the movie is almost humorous, if this analysis is correct.

Anyway, I hope that explanation makes some sense. My professor agreed with it. It was just sheer luck that I stumbled across the title "The Gateless Gate" and something clicked.

I want to buy the film on dvd because I'm dissatisfied with the downloadable versions which have no subtitles! haha
shockmaster93
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby trevor826 » Wed Sep 14, 2005 9:37 am

"I watched the film in my Korean & Japanese Religions class."

I'm surprised at this because the link between this film and buddhism is tenuous at best, sure the setting etc appear to be buddhist but as I said above, "You have to remember that Kim Ki-duk is not a buddhist and is only trying to interpret and understand."

Kim Ki-duk is in fact catholic and there are certainly as many if not more aspects of the film that sway in that direction. Unless of course your religions class was representing the growth of the catholic church in asia over the more traditional religions including buddhism!

Your interpretation may be correct but the only person who could answer that would be the director himself, interesting train of thought though.

Here's the link to my brief comments on the film SSAW&S comments, they certainly don't add anything to this topic but just illustrate how I read the film.

Cheers Trev
trevor826
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby shockmaster93 » Wed Sep 14, 2005 7:46 pm

I agree! I can see definite Catholic influence in the film. Overall, I thought it was a great movie and the only part I could've done without was the shirtless martial arts exercises. I thought it was a little silly. I looked for Roger Ebert's review of the movie on the internet and was shocked that I couldn't find it!
shockmaster93
 

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby collectedsoul » Wed Aug 09, 2006 11:44 pm

merged 2 threads by admin
title edited by admin
original title: door in the temple

I just saw this film tonight...loved it, absolutely loved every moment.
And wrote this immediately after:

Spring, summer, fall, winter and spring was a fable pondering an idea I have encountered before in primary readings of Eastern philosophy. But what blows me away about this film is that this idea can be presented so beautifully and so convincingly in an art-form. Cinema is a legitimate medium of expression after all

The idea is that of mans inevitable sufferings in the world of desires, the world of civilization as we know it. The path to spiritual peace lies in a renunciation of the world of desires. One must be free from all attachments to be free from torments. This idea is truth, it is wisdom.

Being aware of this idea is one thing, but presenting it on screen in a manner that is so impactful as to convince is the work of wisdom and genius combined. Shot after shot of unsurpassable visual beauty punctuate simple but deeply meaningful allegorical fables. An education is contained in this film of astonishing brilliance. Pure inspiration and supreme artistic sensibility have found human form in Kim Ki-Duk.
collectedsoul
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby arsaib4 » Thu Aug 10, 2006 1:14 am

Quite a few members here are fond of this film, and its director. We have an individual thread devoted to Kim Ki-duk's work that might interest you. Have you watched anything else from him?
arsaib4
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby jcdavies » Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:28 am

Yes, it is beautiful. It owes a debt to Why did Bodhi-Dharma Leave for the East?, also Korean from 1988, which was a real labour of love and i thought if anything slightly stronger as a Buddhist meditation on life, nature etc
jcdavies
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby collectedsoul » Thu Aug 10, 2006 6:49 am

arsaib: This was the first film of Kim Ki-Duk I saw. I do have a copy of 3-Iron. Will definitely try and acquire some more of his films...I read last night that he is entirely self-taught as a film-maker? And he dropped out of school so has no formal education...went to France, etc. - very interesting life he's led and one that seems totally at odds with the understanding that he has.

jcdavies: Thanks for the tip...looked up a review of it and it sounds interesting...there's so much to see and most of what is worth seeing is so difficult to find! Are there any other movies exploring the same idea?
collectedsoul
 

Re: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring (Korea)

Postby A » Thu Aug 17, 2006 11:23 pm

Seems like I'mn still the only one who doesn't like the film. This probably indicates i should watch it again.
Overall I found it too didactic and preachy, but it could be that i don't share the films ideology. It's true that desires create suffering, but I think that the "aim" (if one could say that) of man in life is not to ignore desires or try to control them too much, but to see them as part of life itself, accept the suffering, and thus turn it into something else. Overcoming suffering in a confrontation that shows suffering as simply the other side of the medal, and as such a construct of our mind.
But I really should watch the film again more carefully...
A
 

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