Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

This is the place to talk about films from around the world.

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:12 am

wpqx
(1/13/06 11:09 am)

As for Dolly Bell, I saw more of the Makajevek influence. Very similar to earlier Yugoslavian films for me at least. I think Kusturica developed more of his own style afterwards, although it was certainly a positive step up.
hengcs
 


Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:13 am

trevor826
(1/13/06 11:47 am)

All The Boys Are Called Patrick was packaged with one of the Godard dvd's in the UK, can't remember which one though I'm sure I have it, I thought it was great fun, fresh and breezy though definitely more Rhomer than Godard.
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:13 am

madhuban
(1/13/06 2:58 pm)

@ wpqx

unfortunately, i haven't seen any makavejev. just haven't found it in any renting library here. i'll go ahead and buy whatever is available, whenever i can cough up those dollars.

@ trevor

"All The Boys Are Called Patrick" is a bonus with "A Woman Is a Woman"

M
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:13 am

wpqx
(1/13/06 3:20 pm)

I have a generally good source for Eastern European films, although I'm still trying to see I Even Met Happy Gypsies. On a different note the last film I've seen was Gus Van Sant's Gerry (2002), the first in his unofficial trilogy. It's a remarkable step up from the sloppy Finding Forrester, but I'll need a little more meditation time to decide how it fits with his last two films. The style was great, and I kept getting a sense of John Ford with those landscape shots, granted not filled with bad Dmitri Tiomkin music so not quite the same.
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:13 am

madhuban
(1/16/06 6:05 am)

Lemonade Joe or The Horse Opera - Oldrich Lipsky (1964)

Lemonade Joe is a rollicking parody of the wild western, shot in black and white, using colour filters - sepia, red, blue and green - to emotionally code the sequences. The story takes place in an imaginary place called Stetson City and has stock characters like the untainted hero (he drinks only lemonade and campaigns for it) who is the best marksman around, the lecherous, scheming, villain who is "wanted" by the law in four states, the angelic woman who the hero falls for, and the "fallen" woman who has a golden heart, and saves the hero's life a number of times (even though she is attracted to him and he wards her off). The hero wears white throughout (except when, by his own admission, he changes to black to exact vengeance, because black is more suited to that mood) while the villain wears black. What lends this breezy spoof a certain complexity is the strong undercurrent of irony around the actual identity of the marksman hero (gradually revealed) and his obsession with kolaloka lemonade (one cannot avoid the anagram of cocacola). He turns out to be the son of the founder of the brand, who lovingly coerces people to give up other alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages in favour of kolaloka! Therefore, his apparently noble efforts to rid the citizenry of whisky does take on a macabre turn. Trust Oldrich to sneak in this tantalising bit of capitalist critique into what is otherwise an innocent-looking, musical parody of the early western. I loved this film.
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:14 am

A
(1/17/06 6:02 pm)

Sounds very interesting indeed - probably a film to my liking.
Where did you watch this (I`ve never heard of it)?
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:14 am

madhuban
(1/18/06 1:22 am)

@ A

I bought "Lemonade Joe" from a site called superhappyfun. Six months ago, I chanced upon this site after reading Jonathan Rosenbaum's DVD news on cinema-scope.com, where he mentions buying Rivette's "Paris Belongs To Us", among others, from them. Since I also wanted that film, I checked up superhappyfun, and lo, I found approximately 30 czech new wave films, and "Lemonade Joe" among them! A German friend had told me about this film long ago, and I decided to buy it.

M
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 5:14 am

A
(1/19/06 10:21 am)

Thanks for the info.
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 6:13 am

madhuban
(2/7/06 4:30 am)

Electra My Love - Miklos Jancso

This is an incredible film, if you have the taste for a highly personalised contemporary interpretation of myth. Known for paying scant respect to the story, Jancso assumes that the Electra myth is familiar to his audience. Instead of fleshing out his characters - Electra, Orestes and Aegisthus - he composes a ritualistic theatre that communicates through the movements. Against the wide, vast canvas of the Hungarian plain, these weirdly attired (in peasant clothes) figures enact a pageant that is as precise in its choreography, as is the camera movement that captures it. The pageant reinforces one of Jancso's pet themes: oppression. By giving the Electra myth a contemporary home in Hungary, Jancso draws attention to the fact that the history of tyranny and oppression repeats itself endlessly, and the body politic needs to rise from the dead like a phoenix. More than the message, it is the layered vehicle for the message that is riveting. The pageant is performed for the actors (who double up as actors in the pageant and the audience for it), for the camera (that records as it re-choreographs), and for the audience (who read and attribute meaning to this non-linear stylized spectacle). The story and the allegory, if they can be identified as such, are unpacked through these interactions. There are the characteristic long takes that is Jancso's signature. In contrast to Pasolini's "Oedipus Rex" which is also a contemporary interpretation of Greek myth, Jancso does not establish or provide any narrative logic to the transposition of the Electra story in modern Hungary. While Pasolini begins his film with a modern couple in a modern setting, Jancso begins with ritual. "Electra My Love" traverses the grey zone between myth and reality, past and present, deliberately blurring their boundaries. Electra recites paeans to justice and holds forth on the dangers of tyranny, as easily as she is made to sing Hungarian folk songs. Orestes lies dead and is resurrected. Agamemnon's death is ritually re-enacted at Aegisthus' behest and a man sacrificed, while Electra and Orestes have revolvers in their hand and board a phoenix-like red helicopter at the end. These are not inconsistencies or anachronisms (what imdb might call "goofs"); they are simply part of the stylization and emphasise Jancso's exploration of ambiguity as opposed to the story. Ambiguity is also evident in the way the oppressors become the oppressed. "Electra My Love" isn't a film for everyone, but can be hugely rewarding if you are able to get inside Jancso's language and vision.

Perhaps i ought to have posted this in the Eastern european film thread

I also watched Marker's "La Jetee" again after many years. One of those films that will easily make my top 50 list. Will be watching his tribute to Tarkovsky, "One Day In the Life of Andrei Arsenevich" in a festival screening in a couple of weeks Will write about "La Jetee" as also Imamura's "Warm Water Under a Red Bridge", Pasolini's "Porcile" and many many Fassbinders. How do you manage to have your reviews keep pace with your film watching trev? I am way behind

M
hengcs
 

Re: Eastern Europe Excites ... ;)

Postby hengcs » Tue Feb 21, 2006 6:15 am

arsaib4
(2/7/06 10:49 pm)

Perhaps i ought to have posted this in the Eastern european film thread

I think that'd be a good idea, Madhuban. Good review, by the way. I've only seen Electra and The Red and the White from Jancso, and would like to see more of him.
hengcs
 

PreviousNext

Return to Film Talk

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests

cron