Criterion

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Re: Criterion

Postby arsaib4 » Fri Nov 17, 2006 6:26 am

FEBRUARY

WHEN A WOMAN ASCENDS THE STAIRS


Audio commentary by Japanese-film scholar Donald Richie
New video interview with Tatsuya Nakadai
Theatrical trailer
PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by film scholars Audie Bock, Catherine Russell, and Phillip Lopate

49TH PARALLEL

Audio commentary by film and music historian Bruce Eder
The Volunteer, a 1943 Powell and Pressburger war-effort short starring Ralph Richardson
A Pretty British Affair, a BBC documentary on the careers of Powell and Pressburger, which considers their WWII-era collaborators and features rare footage of the filmmakers together
Excerpts from Michael Powell's audio dictations for his autobiography
Original theatrical trailer
PLUS: A new essay by film scholar Charles Barr and an excerpt from Powell's 1941 premiere speech

BICYCLE THIEVES (2-Disc Set)

Working with De Sica, a collection of new interviews with screenwriter Suso Cecchi D'Amico, actor Enzo Staiola (Bruno), and film scholar Callisto Cosulich
Life as It Is, a new program on the history of Italian neorealism in cinema, with scholar Mark Shiel
Documentary on screenwriter and longtime Vittorio De Sica collaborator Cesare Zavattini, directed by Carlo Lizzani
Optional English dubbed soundtrack
arsaib4
 


Re: Criterion

Postby wpqx » Fri Nov 17, 2006 9:04 am

Why is it every time I hunt down a VHS of a film, Criterion decides to release it? When a Woman Ascends the Stairs can be added to that list. Bicycle Thief I'm not even remotely excited about considering it already exists on DVD (Miracle in Milan would have been a better release). However the 49th Parallel is a film I'm more than excited about, and am glad its coming out. I wonder though as the year reaches its conclusion whether any "New" Kurosawa will be released, as well as Bergman.
wpqx
 

Re: Criterion

Postby arsaib4 » Sat Nov 18, 2006 1:14 am

I was pleasantly surprised to see When a Woman Ascends the Stairs on the list since we just mentioned it elsewhere. It's Criterion's first Naruse, and I hope more will follow. MoC is releasing 3 more of his films, but the man directed a few dozen so there's a lot there. Am also excited about 49th Parallel.
arsaib4
 

Re: Criterion

Postby wpqx » Sat Nov 18, 2006 1:57 am

Somehow the abundance of Powell is never a problem for me. I've genuinely been excited about every Production of the Archers release being put out, although this enthusiasm might run out when the Ellusive Pimpernel gets announced. Likewise I'm not sure if any new Kurosawa is on the market, considering they've just re-released three of his films. Bergman has also been well represented, but in the grand scheme of things it is only the tip of the iceberg.
wpqx
 

Re: Criterion

Postby wpqx » Wed Dec 13, 2006 1:18 am

also in February . . .

Paul Robeson: Portraits of the Artist

Body and Soul/Borderline

The Emperor Jones/Paul Robeson: Tribute to an Artist

The Proud Valley/Native Land

Sanders of the River/Jericho



Synopsis
All-American athlete, scholar, renowned baritone, stage actor, and social activist, Paul Robeson (1898-1976) was a towering figure and a trailblazer many times over. He was perhaps most groundbreaking, however, in the medium of film. The son of an escaped slave, Robeson managed to become a top-billed movie star during the time of Jim Crow America, headlining everything from fellow pioneer Oscar Micheaux's silent drama Body and Soul to British studio showcases to socially engaged documentaries, always striving to project positive images of black characters. Increasingly politically minded, Robeson eventually left movies behind, using his international celebrity to speak for those denied their civil liberties around the world and ultimately becoming a victim of ideological persecution himself. But his film legacy lives on and continues to speak eloquently of the long and difficult journey of a courageous and outspoken African American.

Special Features
#
All new, digital transfers created from the best surviving elements
#
Audio commentaries by historians Jeffrey C. Stewart (The Emperor Jones) and Pearl Bowser (Body and Soul)
#
Musical scores by Wycliffe Gordon (Body and Soul) and Courtney Pine (Borderline)
#
1958 Pacifica Radio interview with Paul Robeson (Courtesy of Pacifica Radio Archives)
#
Four new video programs featuring interviews with actors Ruby Dee and James Earl Jones, filmmaker William Greaves, cinematographer Tom Hurwitz, film historians Ian Christie and Stephen Bourne, and Paul Robeson Jr., and including film clips from Song of Freedom (1936), King Solomon's Mines (1937), and Big Fella (193
#
Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
#
PLUS: A book featuring an excerpt from Paul Robeson's Here I Stand, new essays by Clement Alexander Price, Hilton Als, Charles Burnett, Ian Christie, Deborah Willis, and Charles Musser, a reprinted article by Harlem Renaissance writer Geraldyn Dismond, and a note from Pete Seeger

and . . .

Green for Danger

Special Features
#
New, restored high-definition digital transfer
#
Audio commentary by film and music historian Bruce Eder
#
New interview with British film historian Geoff Brown
#
Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
#
PLUS: A new essay by critic Geoffrey O'Brien and a director's statement
wpqx
 

Re: Criterion

Postby wpqx » Thu Dec 21, 2006 11:30 pm

Well Kon Ichikawa's two best films are finally getting released on DVD. The Burmese Harp and Fires on the Plain are both scheduled for March release, as is Jules Dassin's American noir classic The Naked City. Too bad Dassin doesn't get the two pack because Brute Force would be a perfect companion piece. The Naked City has been previously available on DVD courtesy of Kino, but the Criterion edition is not surprisingly much better stocked.
wpqx
 

Re: Criterion

Postby arsaib4 » Fri Dec 22, 2006 2:44 am

I'm certainly looking forward to the Ichikawas. After watching An Actor's Revenge and Tokyo Olympiad, my expectations are high.
arsaib4
 

Re: Criterion

Postby A » Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:24 pm

I have only seen Ichikawas Enjo (Conflagration / 195 which was interesting for its approach to a difficult topic, but it also had a couple of inconsistencies. I would certainly like to see more, and any releases of renowned directors films` get me excited.
Hope to read your opinions when you get hold of the films. It will probably take a while till I will be able to watch them.
A
 

Re: Criterion

Postby wpqx » Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:21 pm

Enjo was my least favorite Ichikawa effort, so if our tastes have any similarities, you'll be more than pleased with the films being released.
wpqx
 

Re: Criterion

Postby arsaib4 » Sun Jan 21, 2007 5:07 am

APRIL

BRUTE FORCE

Audio commentary by film noir specialists Alain Silver and James Ursini
A new interview with Paul Mason, author of "Capturing the Media: Prison Discourse in Popular Culture"
PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by film critic Michael Atkinson

LA HAINE

New English-language audio commentary by writer-director Mathieu Kassovitz
Video introduction by Jodie Foster
Social Dynamite, a new video featurette on the films banlieue setting, including interviews with sociologists Sophie Body-Gendrot, Jeffrey Fagan, and William Kornblum
PLUS: A new essay by film scholar Ginette Vincendeau and notes by acclaimed director Costa-Gavras

OVERLORD

Audio commentary featuring director Stuart Cooper and actor Brian Stirner
Mining the Archive, a new video featuring Imperial War Museum film archivists detailing the war footage used in the film
"Capa Influences Cooper," a new photo essay featuring Cooper on photographer Robert Capa
Cameramen at War, the British Ministry of Informations 1943 film tribute to newsreel and service film unit cameramen
Germany Calling, a 1941 British Ministry of Information propaganda film, clips of which appear in Overlord
Journals from two D-day soldiers, read by Brian Stirner Theatrical trailer
PLUS: A new essay by critic Kent Jones, a short history of the Imperial War Museum, and excerpts from the Overlord novelization, by Cooper and Christopher Hudson
arsaib4
 

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