American cinema as Foreign Film

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American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby ustink » Thu Nov 13, 2003 5:45 pm

For all y'all non-americans out there, how do you feel about American movies? I guess they would be "foreign" to you. Just curious...
ustink
 


Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby auteur » Fri Nov 14, 2003 2:38 am

I don't think it's spelled out anywhere but [u]most[/u] here believe the word [i]Foreign[/i] applies to the language spoken and not to a film's nationality. (Our own Academy uses this definition). Consequently, the Top 100 includes a mere 3 english-language films, none higher than THE SWEET HEREAFTER at #80.
auteur
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby Gaz » Fri Nov 14, 2003 7:25 am

Yes, for the purposes of this site "foreign" usually means in a foreign language. I'm British and I usually think of it this way.
Gaz
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby kjandca » Fri Nov 14, 2003 10:40 pm

Hmmm....I guess that means Canadian movies aren't "Foreign". Geez, I was feeling really smart and intellectaul watching Red Green's "Duct Tape Forever".
kjandca
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby ustink » Mon Nov 17, 2003 3:42 pm

So foreign is anything not spoken in English? Unless it is "artsy". Would you say American English is different than say, British English or Canadian English? Not that I am trying to start a debate, but I have noticed some of us are not from an english -speaking country and thought I'd ask their point of view...
ustink
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby shopgal » Mon Nov 17, 2003 4:16 pm

This discussion reminded me of the "dilemma" I had when I posted abt Foreign Film Fest recommendations, cos some of the films are actually "local" to some pple on this board.

In my country, American and Hong Kong films are very common, altho technically foreign, I still regard them as the usual films hence not "that" foreign. However films from Thailand, Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Iran, Australia, NZ, UK and the European countries are less frequently shown and most of the times only during film festivals (either the annual one or the idividual ones held by the embassies). So I consider all of the them "really" foreign.

So in that sense, I consider UK, Australian and NZ English films more foreign than American English films.
shopgal
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby disable_2001 » Tue Nov 18, 2003 10:30 am

Do not comfuse anti-Americanism with foreign films (we're moving to a different level and it's not so simple at it seems). Also it's not need to be a statistic explanation about this (english language->not foreign). I believe that a foreign film is every film that contains an aesthetism for each of you personally. Foreign film is every movie that's not trying to exhibit the "fashion" and mock you just for a purpose, to get a financial success and serve a system that has no relation with art.
disable_2001
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby ustink » Tue Nov 18, 2003 1:11 pm

Wow! I guess it never occured to me this would really end up as a debate on what defines Foreign Film. All this to say, what is generally thought of American films through a non-American viewpoint. Thanks for the insight of Foreign Film "title" guys :)
ustink
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby auteur » Tue Nov 18, 2003 2:42 pm

Can somebody please translate what disable wrote?
auteur
 

Re: American cinema as Foreign Film

Postby Gaz » Tue Nov 18, 2003 5:17 pm

I think disable was trying to equate foreign films with independent film-making styles and companies. Personally I think it's more complicated than s/he does. It's too simple to apportion a genre to a country. One has to accept that each country's cinema is going to be influenced by that of other countries, hence, for instance, the Taxi films. Not exactly arthouse, are they?
Gaz
 

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