wrong kar-wai

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wrong kar-wai

Postby nana » Tue Mar 27, 2001 6:43 am

ok. we drove 4 hours to see in the mood for love.
i don't know if it was worth it. i can say i liked yi yi better. right now, i would rank it behind days and ashes, but better than fallen and tears. though i really need to see it again.

i thought is was a little too beautiful visually(i doubt they dressed like that all the time), the last 10-15 minutes was choppy, way more incohorent than the first 70 minutes or so. i didn't get the combodia sideplot???(if there's any) i
also thought that the secret to the tree thing was too similar to the end of the world thing in happy. these are the major negatives for me.

on the positive note...
i did like the more classical camera work, angles, placements etc...there weren't any voice-overs, appropriate for this film. i liked the way he incorperated just writing ala godard. i thought the acting was superb by cheung and leung though i prefer if wong prolong a scene(like happytogether tango dancing part) instead of cutting quickly to the next scene. i like the premise of them rehearsing their spouse's action through imagination(confusing, but it's romantic!!!) especially the rehearsal to break apart...seeing maggie weep almost brought tears.
i respect wong for trying to be more subtle, but i really dig his "go all the way" scenes.
lastly, the music is amazing though the waltz gets got to me toward the end. fyi...the novelle that the film is base upon is great!! can't remember the title right now though.

hmmmm...i haven't seen many 2000 foreign films, but i say yi yi and in the mood... are pretty hard to beat.
open to recommendations.
---nana
sorry for spelling and grammar errors;o)
nana
 


Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby acquarello » Tue Mar 27, 2001 1:37 pm

I thought that the "truncated" editing of their encounters were intended to reflect their own truncated relationship and sustains the sense of longing. There is an article on the Village Voice about the film where Maggie Cheung recounts how horrified she was that so much shot footage didn't make it into the final film. She had completely envisioned a different fim. Personally, I thought that by showing just "fleeting glimpses" of their relationship, Wong stayed true to the idea of "missed connection".

Incidentally, I agree with you that "In the Mood for Love" and "Yi Yi" are the films to beat. :)

acquarello
acquarello
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby nana » Tue Mar 27, 2001 7:11 pm

let me be a little more specific about the "truncsate" editing. the scenes where they were together were great with this editing(showing the missed connections and all"), but i thought it would have been better to prolong some scene where it was showing only one of the characters.
...time seems to stop while one's comtemplating or longing
like the secret to the tree scene which was proplonged.
anyhow...i need to see it again. i think days of being wild
showed missed connections and the idea of one is always alone quite well...sorta remind me of camus's le stranger.

---nana
nana
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby katsuben » Sun Apr 01, 2001 2:53 am

In the Mood came out in Adelaide last week. After the shenannigans of missing the sold-out preview, I finally saw it two days ago. I have ideas about the nature of the style but they're still forming. Does anyone agree with me that In the Mood is reminisceint of Vivre sa vie (dissonance in style) and L'Eclisse (dissatisfaction/alienation thematics)? Both were made in 1962, when In the Mood's story begins. The Cambodian narrative at the end features footage of De Gaulle. Why? The year is 1966, roughly the end of La Nouvelle Vague. Is this resonating for anyone? I don't know what I'm trying to say about what WKW is trying to say, but perhaps something is being said about continental influence in South-East Asian history leading to an influence in cinematic style (especially WKW's own influences). I enjoyed the film a lot and if it marks a shift in the stylistic interests of WKW, I look forward to seeing where he goes from here. Does anyone know why Chris Doyle is merely the co-cinematographer? Something that immensely annoyed a friend was the lack of the song, In the Mood for Love; the Brian Ferry version heard in the previews. He was really pissed off. But the Nat King Cole selection sat with me very well. One dramatic difference from the old WKW was the abundant use of repetition and ellipsis. There seems to be a large focus on rhythm and, dare I say it, revealing of narrative in a decidedly Hou Hsiao-hsien like manner. Perhaps Doyle got a little irritated at all this formalism. :-/
katsuben
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby nana » Mon Apr 02, 2001 6:07 am

funkyduck---

i think you are reading too much into it, but it is interesting though...explain " but perhaps something is being said about continental influence in South-East Asian history leading to an influence in cinematic style (especially WKW's own influences).

i would like to hear more on that.
how do you rank in the mood...compare to his other films?
---nana
nana
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby katsuben » Fri Apr 06, 2001 11:30 pm

nana, i may well be interpreting too widely and not looking at the film as a film. but given that i've only seen it once, that is what i instantly thought about at first. i think what i said is about as far as i can explain it at the moment: continental interests in south-east asia (e.g. the french-indochina occupation) may have led to certain continental impressions subverting the socio-culture of south-east asia, a part of which is cinema. make sense?

comparisons? as i said, i liked the film a lot. i would find it hard to discursively compare/contrast it to his other films without segmentation and discreet analysis. it certainly seems to represent a shift, somewhat of a maturity.
katsuben
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby katsuben » Fri Apr 06, 2001 11:31 pm

i'd like to see other opinions on the ending. any takers?
katsuben
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby acquarello » Sat Apr 07, 2001 9:14 am

It is hard to definitively state that this is Wong's transitional film without seeing what his next project looks like ("2004", I think), although the lack of the voice-over narrative and the more polished look of "In the Mood for Love" seems to point in that direction.

Incidentally, if I remember the Voice article correctly, "In the Mood for Love" was not only shot somewhat in conjunction with "2004", but there were also some reshoot overlaps involving actors Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung who were also working a Hou Hsiao Hsien film. So, maybe there is something of style influence that resulted from the experience.

*PLOT SPOILERS*
Regarding the ending of the film, I didn't necessarily see use of the country of Cambodia as a specific allusion to something. What I had interpreted from the film was Mr. Chow's continued feeling of wandering, which also expounds on the film's theme of transience - not only with respect to love and relationships, but also the life stages of existence (an early image of the film are the two moving into their respective apartments).

acquarello
www.filmref.com
acquarello
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby nana » Sat Apr 07, 2001 6:53 pm

the novella which the film was based upon is called duidao
(intersection) by liu yichang written in the 70's. i read an excerpt of it. it is quite good. the film kinda took the idea and ran with it, but the novella is great in itself.
you might want to dig it up.
---nana

ps. funkyduck...the ending, do you mean the tree segment or the years later, they almost intersect. it was choppy...what part in particular were you referring to?
nana
 

Re: wrong kar-wai

Postby katsuben » Wed Apr 11, 2001 12:27 am

It continues to be satisfying to discuss WKW with you two. Nana, I guess what interests me most about the ending is the stock footage of De Gaulle/Cambodia. Acquarello, I agree that there seems small potential to be gained from digging too deeply beyond obvious thematics in this film, but there seems to be something WKW has attempted to say and I'd enjoy anyone's speculations as to what it is. The ending is bizarre enough to entertain various interpretations. The idea of wandering certainly comes across strong, but does it include the French wandering into South-East Asia (stock footage)? If so, what does that imply? Perhaps I would like to link the idea of wandering with the concept of imperialism and bring it into arguments about the form of the film (undeniably different to previous WKW films and, to me at least, very similar to the stylistic dissonance of 'Vivre sa vie'). The tenuousness of my stance is only limited by the evidence that seems available.
katsuben
 

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