The Last Film Seen

This is the place to talk about films from around the world.

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Sun Aug 07, 2005 3:23 pm

The World (2005)

Got to see this film Friday. Unfortunately the week before Jonathan Rosenbaum was at the theater to lead a discussion afterwards, but I had to miss that showing. I did enjoy the film, but I believe there is a thread on the picture, so I'll save my comments for that.
wpqx
 


Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Sun Aug 07, 2005 6:25 pm

Casanova (1976) - Federico Fellini

What a mess, horrible dubbing, awful acting, and just plain nonsense.

Luna (1979) - Bernardo Bertolucci

This film should have never been made, not really a saving grace about it, possibly Bertolucci's worst film, although I haven't seen them all.
wpqx
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:07 am

Alfie (1966) - Lewis Gilbert

Interesting British film that seems badly dated. I must say I liked it better the first time, when it was The Knack and Richard Lester was the director. Granted the films aren't really similar, but Lester had a wonderful quality of not taking himself seriously, which unfortunately Gilbert doesn't have. I believe this would function better as a straight comedy, but well then it wouldn't have gotten a best picture nomination, and I probably wouldn't have seen it. If you're a Michael Caine fan this is worth checking out in the days before everyone shamelessly kissed his ass.
wpqx
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby kookook » Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:35 pm

The last movie I saw was The Ring 2. It was complete garbage. My band's rhythm guitarist and I went to see it. Everyone was talking so we didn't have a problem letting our "punk rock" influence shine out. We were screaming randomly, laughing when anyone died(the faces of those killed by Samara are the same as the guy on The Wall by Pink Floyd). I had a bottle in my pocket, a tobasco bottle guitar slide, and I was hitting random people with it saying "I knight thy." Chase ran up to the front and kicked the screen. In the scene where the young possessed boy me and chase both yelled "YAY! Penut butter and pills!"

Twas a great time, and we didn't get kicked out because every one else was carrying on. I heard four cellphones go off and distictivly heard a couple having sex. God I live in such a red neck town.
kookook
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby trevor826 » Wed Aug 10, 2005 6:16 pm

kookook, where are you from, since you've seen "Descent" I assume you're in the UK?

Cheers Trev.
trevor826
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Wed Aug 10, 2005 8:47 pm

Well redneck would imply somewhere in the US

I just saw Saraband, and already posted a thread of it.
wpqx
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby trevor826 » Wed Aug 10, 2005 8:56 pm

Yes, the "Redneck" phrase is usually associated with the US and was why asked the question.

Strange, perhaps kookook will deem to enlighten us.

Cheers Trev.
trevor826
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Fri Aug 12, 2005 2:04 am

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2003)

Decent film, but had that lul of a second film in a series. Hopefully the third is better, as I'm told it is. Production values are still great, but John Williams score grew tiresome, and I think more could have been done with the film.
wpqx
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Sat Aug 13, 2005 3:38 pm

Law and Order (1969) - Frederick Wiseman

Absolutely fantastic filmmaking. Wiseman is a documentarian in the truest sense. He simply turns his camera on and makes a movie. There is no commentary, no interviews, no stock footage, no establishing shots. Simply one encounter after another.

This film takes a look at well Law and Order, focusing on the life of Missouri Police Officers, and the people they run into on the job. Some are violent, some are docile, and some are just plain silly. It's all great though, the way Cops should be.
wpqx
 

Re: The Last Film Seen

Postby wpqx » Sat Aug 13, 2005 5:24 pm

Made in USA (1966) - Jean Luc Godard

Some filmmakers are instantly and consistently entertaining, Godard is one of them. This was still during his adventerous sixties phase, so it bears many similarities to the films directly preceeding it. In fact it was shot simultaneously with Two or Three Things I Know About Her. This atakes Godard's love of America a little further, with a high amount of film references as always, including one of the main characters being named Widmark. The story is a conventional murder mystery, but when have you known Godard to shoot anything conventionally? He takes the tired and stale subject matter, and turns it into a fresh politically charged blend of avant-garde filmmaking. The man is a legend, and despite his most recent work, his reputation was well earned off of films like this.
wpqx
 

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